Travel Photography Tip: Look Both Ways

I’ve gotten yelled at by my fair share of security guards for either inadvertently – or purposely – trespassing, and/or taking photos where signs specifically say not to do so.  WhoopsQuanzhou, Fujian, China - Qingjing Mosque

For instance, at the above Qingjing Mosque in Quanzhou, China – which was completely roughly in 1009 – a Japanese tour group thought that I was praying in one of the halls, and started taking photos of me…whereas in fact, I was trying to position my camera on the ground to capture a certain angle of the room.  Upon telling the tour guide and group this, the guide admonished me, and noted that I wasn’t allowed to take pictures.  Double standard much?

The point of today’s post, as you’ll soon see, is about letting your imagination as travel photographer roam free.  Heh, didn’t mean for that to rhyme.  Also, I guess this will be prohibited reading in a few countries.

Though it sounds like I’m condoning illegal activity, as long as it isn’t illegal – and that no one’s around hounding you for baksheesh – don’t simply settle for the hackneyed slideshow.  Have another example:

Mandalay, Myanmar (Burma) - Buddhist Statue with Cobra (1)Here, we have Buddhist statue located in Mandalay, Burma (or Myanmar, depending on your loyalties).  Oftentimes, a deity in the form of a cobra, called Mucalinda, is depicted in Buddhist works, as if to be shielding Buddha from looming storms soon after he gained enlightenment.

What’s going on in the back?

Mandalay, Myanmar (Burma) - Buddhist Statue with Cobra (2)For which of the two creatures is this less comfortable?

Guess I have unquenchable intrigue in more just the most famous aspects of points of interest.  There could have been a plaque…in the back.  Or, other more recently added designs.  Or nuanced graffiti.  Or someone charging to take photos of said back.

Basically, don’t restrict yourself to the usual.

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About buildingmybento

Bread, olive oil Waking up in Nakagin Sure does sound like me
This entry was posted in Architecture, China & Hong Kong, East & Southeast Asia and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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