Buying Socks in China: Tougher Than It Sounds

Before visiting China for the first time in August 2003, I truly expected to find clothes cleaners (洗染店 xǐ​rǎn​diàn) all over the place.  Was this the first thing on my mind as I landed in Guilin?  No.  It was the second.  The first was “do I have SARS?”

Frankly speaking, I don’t recall seeing even one brick-and-mortar launderer in Guilin.  Successive trips to China and Hong Kong have shown me that washing clothes is still very much done at home, and drying clothes is for ANYWHERE you can find space.

In order to do that, you first need to own clothes.

Shanghai - Shoe Socks
I took this photo in Shanghai in 2008.  The sign – which in Chinese, reads wà​zi, or socks – is immensely confounding.  Where are the shoes?  The socks?  The employees?

I’m not even talking about the bizarre sign.  It looks like a store that sells fish, keys and blades, you know, not socks.  MacGyver would be proud.

All of this thinking made me hungry.

Advertisements

About buildingmybento

Bread, olive oil Waking up in Nakagin Sure does sound like me
This entry was posted in China & Hong Kong, Clothing, East & Southeast Asia and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Buying Socks in China: Tougher Than It Sounds

  1. Well of course you can buy shoe socks there. You know, as opposed to other socks, like trouser socks, and hat socks.

轮到你了

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s